Attracting Birds

We at Great Salt Lake Audubon love birds, but we realize they may not be the most interesting creatures to everyone, especially when they can usually only be seen from a distance. Inviting birds to visit your yard is a great way to become more familiar with their beautiful features and quirky behaviors. 

Interested in attracting birds to your yard? Check out these articles, tips, and activities below!

Challenge:

Make one change to your yard to make it safer for birds! 

Here are some examples of things you can do: 

  • Move bird feeders closer than 3’ or further than 30’ from your windows 
  • Keep your cats inside
  • Put up window decals or another product to keep birds from striking your windows
  • Plant a bird-friendly plant
  • Add a water feature or bird bath to your yard

 

ACTIVITY: DIY PINE CONE FEEDER

IMG 4898

If you don't have a lot in the way of trees and plants, you can attract birds with feeders. Reusable feeders should be cleaned and maintained to reduce the risk of spreading disease and bacteria. Although there are LOADS of beautiful, creative, bird feeding devices out there, there are several DIY designs you can make with materials you already have. One of my favorites is this Pinecone Bird Feeder:

Materials

  • Pinecones*
  • Peanut butter, sun butter, or honey
  • Bird seed
  • String

*You can also use a toilet paper roll, or even a stick. Just be sure you return to collect anything that must be thrown away. I prefer to use pinecones and prop them in the branches instead of using string, just in case I forget to go back out and collect the trash I've left in the tree. No waste!

Steps

  1. Cover your pinecone with peanut butter (use sun butter or honey for a nut-free alternative).
  2. Roll the pinecone in a bowl of bird seed.
  3. Tie string to your pinecone (remember to come back for it when the seeds are gone).
  4. Hang and enjoy!

It may take several days, or even weeks, for your feeders to be discovered, but once they are the seeds will go quickly! These pinecones can be left in the tree (minus their strings), or refilled.